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Diabetes Management: Causes, Signs and Tips to Help Your Pet Cope With The Condition

It’s hard to hear the news that your pet has diabetes.

The harsh truth is that dogs and cats develop diabetes just as people do.

You’ll have a few burning questions in your mind. What caused this debilitating illness in your pet? How do you know that your pet has it, and more importantly, how do you control it?

diabetes
Pets with diabetes can life a normal life.

Causes of Diabetes In Pets

Diabetes is frustrating, but will not inconvenience your dog or cat if you manage it. The first step to doing this is to understand its causes.

Obesity is a top trigger of diabetes. A pet which is overweight tends to have problems processing insulin.

Pets may also develop this illness if they are couch potatoes. If your pet does not walk or jog regularly, it’s likely to have problems processing Insulin later in life.

Also, studies show that diabetes in pets has links with autoimmune diseases. Pets with Lupus, Dry Eye, and Addison’s disease are likely to have it.

Signs that your pet Could Have Diabetes

How would you know that your cat or dog has diabetes? It would display the following signs.

1. Increased urination

First of all, your pet will start urinating more than usual because its blood sugar levels are high. They become so significant that the sugar deposits show themselves in your pets’ urine.

2. Weight Loss

Your pet will become thinner not because it eats less, but because the cells in its body don’t use the energy from the nutrients efficiently. It experiences weight loss though it takes in more calories.

3. Lack of energy.

The lack of nutrition will also make it tired. The fatigue happens because the body requires blood sugar.

4. Vision Problems

Pets with diabetes frequently develop vision problems as well. Improper processing of sugar heightens the chance of cataracts.

5. Weakness in the rear limbs

Also, your pet’s back legs may become weak. It may develop what’s known as the ‘plantigrade stance.’ Your pet will drop on its hind legs and walk on its back ankles.

6′ Urinary tract infections

UTIs are another common feature of this condition. They’re likely to happen as sugar in the blood builds up.

7. Kidney Failure

Finally, your pet may develop renal failure. Its kidneys can’t process sugar, so any excess will spill over into the kidneys and damage them.

Tips to manage a pet with diabetes

Diabetes is a tricky condition which requires careful and consistent management. Here are some strategies to make the task easier.

First of all, monitor your pet’s condition regularly. Doing this will help you note dangerous spikes and drops in blood sugar.

Make sure that your pet gets its regular insulin medication. There are insulin products specially made for pets. Get your vet’s advice on what these are.

Also, make sure that you feed your pet a proper diet. It should eat foods that minimize blood sugar fluctuations.

Another thing you can do to help your pet cope with this malady is to make sure that it exercises. Dogs are natural runners, while cats are star climbers. Doing either will help these animals stay in tip-top shape.

Finally, make sure that your pet gets its routine checks. This condition affects pets differently over time, so visiting your vet when it is time for a checkup will help your pet get used to prodding and poking.

If your pet has diabetes, take heart. A little common sense management will help it stay in good health.



Cloudy the dedicated Space Dog:Although not quite willing

 

Space Dog
Cloudy in Outer Space

Space Dog

Cloudy turned professional space dog this week and explored the far reaches of the universe. She looks a little sulky because she does not like her helmet much. I have to put this little contraption on Cloudy so as to prevent her from biting herself. As you can see, she does not relish the though of not being able to bend over and scratch.

Like all Westies, she is prone to yeast infections, which are sometimes quite unbearable. She will return to her usual barking and romping activities, the let’s hope, by next week. Until then, has to remain the ever dedicated astronaut.

Tips for Taking Care of Disabled Pets

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There are disabled pets, as there are humans with physical difficulties.

They may result from injury, aging, or, in an adverse scenario, abuse. Many disabled pets end up abandoned. Owners would be less likely to neglect disabled pets if they had the resources and savvy to care for them.

8 Tips for Taking Care of Disabled Pets

1. Understand that Disabled Pets Do Not Need Sympathy

Handicapped animals do not need you to feels sorry for them. They live life as they should, and do not feel that they are disabled. That said, a show of affection never hurts.

2. Handicapped Pets Understand Love

Disabled pets sense your love.They live life like fully functioning animals, albeit at a slower pace. 3.

3. View taking care of a handicapped pet as a privilege

You will seldom have the opportunity to care for a disabled pet. When you stop seeing the task as a burden, you will discover how it can help you grow. You will also get the opportunity to slow down and enjoy beautiful moments with your furry friend.

4. Consult Specialists

There is no better way to deal with issues than to listen to a voice of reason. Experts may give you the advice you need to manage your pet’s condition.

5. Create a routine and stick to it

Disabled pets may find it difficult to adapt to sudden changes in the environment. To help a blind dog, for example, keep your furniture in a fixed position. You will make it easy for them to navigate your home. They will need extra attention, so keeping to a schedule will help you to accommodate their needs.

6. Invest in equipment

With the proper equipment, disabled pets can have a high quality of life. K-9 carts, for instance, help handicapped dogs run as fast as their able counterparts.

7. Take the challenge

Caring for a disabled pet may be demanding, but presents opportunities for growth. Seeing it thrive in spite of its disabilities is rewarding.

8. Get support

The rigors of owning a disabled pet can be overwhelming. Doing everything yourself is impossible, so seek help from the experts.

Being the owner of a pet with disabilities can be fulfilling, with a little knowledge.


Helping your pet cope with growing older

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The little puppy you brought home ten or so years ago was a romping, roly-poly ball of fur. It jumped on your sofa with abandon and never minded a little rough play. A decade on, it is no longer enthusiastic or active. It reminds you of old Mr. Jones a few doors away, who needs a walking stick. 
 
Old age strikes pets as it does humans. They have the same aches and pains that grandpa and grandma have. Like your human seniors, they may display moody, erratic behaviors. As a pet owner, you can help your beloved pet to cope with old age by understanding expected changes, empathizing with their behavioral problems and doing what you can to help him deal with its rigors. 
 
Expected changes in Senior Pets
 
Physical changes take place in animals, just as they do in elderly humans. Illnesses become pervasive, and organs may not function as well as before. Spotting the changes can ease financial and emotional burdens. 
 
A dog’s nutritional needs change as it ages. Older dogs may consume more fat, as they may lose some of it. Monitor your pet’s weight changes carefully. 
 
Older pets may develop gray hairs, just as humans do. Haircoats may become thinner, and duller. Lumps may start to appear on its skin as well. Groom your pet constantly, and check for any skin changes.
 
Your pet may become more prone to injury. It may find it a task to fight off infectious diseases as well. Diabetes, common in elderly humans, is typical in older pets too. 
 
If you have a female pet, she may experience the hardening of her mammary glands as she ages.  If not checked, she may develop cancer. Her footpads may become brittle and thick. You may need to clip her nails and coat more often. 
 
You may find your pet becoming less active because of muscle and bone degeneration. Arthritis is a common health problem in senior pets, just as it is in older humans. Your pet will find moving and breathing a task. Exercise it regularly to prevent muscle loss.
 
Older dogs are prone to dental and other degenerative diseases. Dental disease may make it difficult for it to take in food. It may be troubled by hearing and vision loss. 
 
Behavioral Problems in Senior Pets
 
Senior dogs often suffer a decline in their functions. Their memories, cognition, awareness and senses deteriorate. 
 
The decline may disrupt their sleep-wake cycles and make them fidgety at night. They may also wander about and fidget more. 
 
Like older people, animals may forget details, like the commands they knew from long ago. They may either become overdependent or, conversely, disinterested in affection. 
 
4 Behavior Problems in Senior Dogs and how to Solve them
 
There is no question that older dogs go through change. If yours shows any of these behaviors, it is time to take action. 
 
1. Cognitive Dysfunction
 
Your pet’s brain may slow down in several ways.  He may become confused, or fail to recognize you. Also, he may experience changes in his sleep-wake cycle and forget how to use the potty. 
 
Veterinarians will usually recommend the drug Selegiline Hydrochloride to counter the degeneration. You may also combine the medication with the behavioral treatment given by a dog trainer. 
 
2. Separation Anxiety
 
Older dogs may become irritable when taken to new environments. They may display aggression and anxiety when left alone. 
 
It is not advisable to keep a senior dog with separation anxiety in a crate, especially if it is not accustomed to being isolated. It may attempt to escape if it cannot control its bladder or other physical functions, and hurt itself in the process. 
 
If your dog paces about when you leave it alone, soils your home or is destructive, it is time to manage its behavior. Your vet will try to identify underlying problems and may prescribe medication to aid your dog’s cognition.
 
Control your responses to your pet’s conduct. If your dog nudges you, you may feel tempted to give in because you think the behavior is cute. Doing so may cause it to believe that it is in control of the situation. 
 
Change your routine to help your dog get over the fear of being separated from you. Use a different door when you go out, and leave your things in different places.          
 
3. Excessive Vocalization 
 
Your pet’s vocalization may disrupt your sleep or irritate your neighbors. The vocalization may be due to fear or separation anxiety. 
 
Loss of hearing may contribute to his excessive vocalization as well. He may also whine a bit more if he feels the urge to eliminate. 
 
If your dog still vocalizes when you are at home, seek the help of a behaviorist. Do not reinforce the vocalizing behavior; instead, reward it when it keeps quiet on cue.                                                                                                   
4. Restlessness
 
Your dog may become less active during the day but restless when it is time to sleep. Eyesight or hearing loss may trigger its nighttime activity.  Your pet may also have medical issues, such as problems with its central nervous system.
 
Treat its medical conditions first, then retrain it to resume normal waking hours. Keep it exercised both physically and mentally; give it lots of chew toys and take it out for regular walks.                                                                          
 
A little loving kindness and effort will help your older pet through its difficulties, and strengthen the bond between you.                                                                                                              


                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                   

Intelligent Disobedience: What a Guide Dog will Teach You

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Intelligent disobedience. The phrase is a mouthful, and the concept behind them difficult to grasp. They seem like a contrary combination of words.
 
You may wonder what this strange idea is, and what it has to do with dogs. It is certainly one a physically challenged person cannot put aside, for it will benefit him greatly.
 
Training a dog not to obey when necessary is no mean feat. If your curiosity as been piqued, you will want to know how trainers manage it.
 
What is intelligent disobedience?
The phrase refers to a service animal going against his owner’s wishes. It does so in an attempt to help the owner make better decisions.

The aim of intelligent disobedience is to keep the physically challenged safe. It is an indispensable part of a service animal’s job.and has been part of their training since 1936.

The benefits of intelligent disobedience

This practice instills animals with a sense of responsibility. They feel valued, and will connect better with you. The mutual respect will make it possible for them to have your interests in mind. It engenders respect between owners and their dogs.

How to teach guide dogs intelligent disobedience

Knowing when to obey is a challenge for humans and dogs. Trainers teach guide dogs intelligent disobedience in a variety of ways.
 
The most common of these methods is some form of aversive training.Owners use the technique most often when crossing roads. Trainers teach dogs, with a forward command, how to move across roads and stop at curbs. Once the dog makes it across successfully, they use a squirt gun if it gets too close to cars and other dangerous objects.
 
To give the dog examples of dangerous situations, the trainer moves him close to the edge of a curb. He “falls off” the edge to show the dog how dangerous it is. The dog also learns not to bring its owner too close to passing cars or obstacles.
 
As the dog develops recognition of such situations, the trainer will increase their difficulty. The dog gets a reward when it reacts to them appropriately.
 
Intelligent disobedience: It works both ways
 
The concept of Intelligent Disobedience works both ways. The dog must know when to disobey while humans must practice intelligent obedience. They must listen to their canine friends if they highlight dangerous situations. The owner must have implicit trust in his dog’s judgment.
 
Supposing an owner gives instructions to the guide dog to cross the street, but cars are still passing. The dog should have the intelligence to refuse his owner’s instructions. The command must also be exact, or the animal will not attempt to cross.
 
How you can apply it in other fields
 
Dogs are not the only creatures which can disobey when the time is right. Humans can too. A good place to start using intelligent disobedience is in the workplace.
 
When working in a team, try to put your ideas in place using the bottom-up approach. Learn to appreciate helpful feedback from your colleagues.
 
Appoint someone to be the devil’s advocate. His function is to monitor your ideas and to challenge them should they be unworkable.He provides alternative suggestions to yours.
 
Now that you know what intelligent disobedience is, you can make it work for you and your pet.
 
 
http://nativeremedies.evyy.net/c/250951/196282/3345
 

The benefits of soft dog crates

Your pet may annoy you by creeping into the kitchen while you are in the middle of preparing a glorious feast. He may also frighten your guests.

Having him underfoot is maddening and dangerous. Crate training will prevent him from obstructing you at the wrong times.

You can choose from many dog crates available. The right one will put both you and your pet at ease. There are reasons why a soft dog crate brings out a pet’s wagging tail.

The benefits of crate training

Before discussing why soft containers are helpful, understand the benefits of crate training.

Crate training may seem restrictive, and this is understandable. No one likes the idea of confinement. That said, it has many benefits for dogs and their owners.

a. For You

Parents get excited when they find out that their children have musical inclinations. They become eager to start when their kids can start their musical journeys.

When a child can begin lessons depends on whether he has the motivation to learn the instrument. It is a gargantuan task getting children who hate doing so learn an instrument.

Then, there is the fun factor. Educational psychologists all suggest that learning takes place when people enjoy the process.

Music lessons can start anytime, as long as the child shows interest in learning them.

Such a container will give you peace of mind. You will feel satisfied that your dog is safe while you are away running errands. If he is travelling with you, you can relax knowing that the crate will protect him from injury.

It also enables you to house train your dog. Your pet needs to know where his sleeping and toileting areas are. A crate is a resting area for him.

It prevents your dog from being in the way, at the wrong times. You can leave him it in while service personnel are doing work around your home. He can take refuge in it while you are in the kitchen.

b. For Your Dog

A crate is your dog’s territory. It is a place where he can feel protected from any ongoing noise or activity in the home.

A dog’s hearing is six times better than that of a human’s. Loud sounds alarm him more than they do you. A crate shields him from these noises.

It also encourages him to control his bowels. Your dog is not likely to relieve himself in his place of rest. He will associate elimination with the outdoors.

You can introduce your pet to your friends if you use a crate. It stops him from jumping up and startling them.

6 reasons why a soft dog crate will make your pet happy

Securing your dog in a crate has clear benefits, but the wrong one can be uncomfortable for him. A soft-sided container will serve his needs better than a metal or plastic one. He is more likely to wag his tail when he sees it.

1. He can travel with you.

For a start, it is easy to store. Easy storage makes it ideal for traveling because you can fold it up and put it in the back seat of your car. Your dog will perk up knowing that he can journey with you.

2. He can be part of the family.

Your pet will be happy knowing that he has a place in the family room. You can integrate a soft crate with your furniture at home.

It fits well into any corner of your living room. Just tuck it away in your storeroom if you are not using it.

3. He can scratch it.

Manufacturers make soft dog crates out of durable nylon. This material does not tear even if your dog scratches it to no end.

4. He gets into it in no time.

These crates are easy to set up. Your dog can move into his home in no time.

Soft containers are easy to fold and unfold. There is no need to screw any nuts and bolts together.

5. Your pet can move about in it without making a sound.

A soft dog crate means less stress for you and your dog.

A great boon of using one is that your dog will not make too much noise if he turns around in it. A metal one, in reverse, gives off sounds.

6. Your dog will have a clean home.

Your dog will take a shine to his home because it is clean.

Materials used to make soft dog crates are hardy, yet pliable enough to wash. Just give your dog’s a weekly rinse to get rid of pet odors.

Buying a soft dog crate

Soft-sided crates are ideal places of solitude for dogs. Of course, you must bear these pointers in mind when choosing one.

1. Purpose

Think about why you want to put your dog in a container. A soft-sided crate is ideal if you always take your dog on road trips.

A wire crate may serve you better if you wish to leave your dog outdoors. With more openings, it is cooler.

2. Security

You should be able to zip up a soft crate. Its base and sides should not feel as though they are about to give way.

3. Durability

When choosing a soft dog crate, assess its strength and quality. Your dog should not be able to tear holes in its base. Weigh your pet and choose one that is firm enough to hold him.

4. Usability

Find out how user-friendly the soft dog crate is. You should be able to zip and fold it. Do not buy it otherwise.

5. Attractiveness

If you plan to use the container at home, you will not want it to jar with the rest of your furniture. Soft dog crates come in various colors. Pick one that goes with the color scheme of your home.

6. Size

Size is an important factor when choosing a container for your dog. Of course, there is no point buying one if your dog cannot fit into it. Note that your pet may roll around and injure himself if the crate is too large.

The right soft dog crate will please your pet.